City of Ottawa: New helpful booklet on youth criminal justice

12 11 2018

From the City of Ottawa

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New helpful booklet on youth criminal justice!

Are you concerned about your son or daughter? Need more information? Check out this handy booklet, “Youth Criminal Justice: What Parents Should Know.”

  • Recognize the warning signs of a youth getting into trouble
  • Learn how to help
  • Understand more about the Canadian youth justice system
  • Find out about resources available to your family

Raising kids is not an easy task, especially when parents are faced with other difficulties such as being new to the country or living in poverty. This booklet, developed by the Local Agencies Serving Immigrants Coalition, provides important information and offers some helpful strategies to combat these issues.

Click here to read the booklet online.  To order print booklets, email us at cpo@ottawa.ca. Please specify English or French, number of booklets required, and a mailing address.

Please help us spread the word by sharing this email with a friend or colleague. If you no longer wish to receive emails from us, reply to this communiqué with the word “unsubscribe.”

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Nouvelle brochure utile sur la justice pénale pour les adolescents!

Vous êtes inquiet à propos de votre fils ou de votre fille? Vous avez besoin de plus amples renseignements? Consultez la brochure fort pratique intitulée Système de justice pénale pour les adolescents : Ce que les parents devraient savoir.

  • Reconnaissez les signes indiquant qu’un jeune a des ennuis.
  • Apprenez comment l’aider.
  • Comprenez mieux le système canadien de justice pénale pour les adolescents.
  • Découvrez les ressources à la disposition de votre famille.

Ce n’est pas facile d’élever des enfants, en particulier quand les parents sont aux prises avec d’autres difficultés, par exemple du fait qu’ils sont nouvellement arrivés au pays ou vivent dans la pauvreté. Cette brochure, élaborée par la coalition Local Agencies Serving Immigrants, fournit de l’information importante et propose des stratégies utiles pour régler ces problèmes.

Cliquez ici pour lire la brochure en ligne. Pour commander des brochures papier, envoyez-nous un courriel à pco@ottawa.ca. Veuillez indiquer votre adresse postale et le nombre d’exemplaires demandés et préciser si vous souhaitez recevoir la brochure en français ou en anglais.

Veuillez partager ce courriel avec vos collègues. Si vous ne souhaitez plus recevoir nos courriels, veuillez répondre avec le mot désabonnement.

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City of Ottawa: Registration for the Planning Primer II – Development Review and Implementation

8 11 2018

From the City of Ottawa:

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https://ottawa.ca/en/city-hall/planning-and-development/community-involvement/planning-primer

Planning Primer

Register

November 17 or 19, 2018 – offered in English – 8:30 am – 12 pm

November 20, 2018 – offered in French – 9:00 am – 12 pm

Billings Room, second floor, City hall

 

What is Planning Primer?

The program is a series of half-day courses. The series includes two core courses and two elective courses.

The core courses, called Primer I and Primer II, describe the legislative and policy basis under which land-use planning decisions are made, the way policy documents are amended and how to make a development application.

The program aims to:

  • Build and maintain a strong working relationship and understanding between the City of Ottawa and communities
  • Provide resources and teach skills to aid residents participating in the land-use planning process

 

Who is invited to attend?

All members of the public including developers, real estate agents, lawyers, builders and community representatives are invited to attend.

Questions?

Please send your questions to primer@ottawa.ca(link sends e-mail)

Planning Primer Courses and Electives

Online materials now available for Courses and Electives

Primer 1 [ PDF 1.182 MB ]PDF opens in a new tab or window Version 1 posted fall 2015

Primer II [ PDF 1.762 MB ]PDF opens in a new tab or window Version 1 posted fall 2015

Electives

Development Charges Elective [ PDF 640 KB ]PDF opens in a new tab or window

Park Planning Elective [ PDF 5.807 MB ]PDF opens in a new tab or window

Residential Intensification and Infill Elective [ PDF 6.083 KB ]PDF opens in a new tab or window

Heritage Planning Elective [ PDF 3.550 MB ]PDF opens in a new tab or window

Secondary Planning Processes Elective [ PDF 9.959 MB ]PDF opens in a new tab or window

Natural Systems Elective [ 4.923 MB ]PDF opens in a new tab or window

Planning for Healthy Communities Elective [ PDF 3.198 MB ]PDF opens in a new tab or window

While attending the courses in person allows one to benefit from the personal knowledge shared by the presenters and the question and answer periods, these online materials will provide a useful summary for use between courses as well as for those who are unable to attend in person.

Expansion of the online Planning Primer materials is under way.

Please register to receive our e-newsletter notification to receive more information about the courses and upcoming dates.

Planning Primer Calendar
2018 Dates Times and Location
Primer I September 22 and 24 (offered in English) 8:30 am – 12 pm
Richmond Room, 2nd Floor
City Hall
Primer II November 17 and 19 (offered in English) 8:30 am – 12 pm
Billings Boardroom, 2nd Floor
City Hall
Elective

Registration opens two weeks before the course date and is on a first come, first served basis. Pre-registration is not accepted.

Zoning By-laws

Council approved the new Comprehensive Zoning By-law, which harmonizes the existing 36 zoning by-laws from the former municipalities into one by-law.

For more information about how zoning and planning work in the City, please see Development Review.

How to find current zoning information

Property zoning information is easily accessed through a simple address search leading you to the appropriate section of the by-law. You may also telephone or visit a Development Information Officer (DIO) in any of the City’s Client Service Centres.

  • City Hall Client Service Centre – 613-580-2424, ext. 28333
  • Orléans Client Service Centre – 613-580-2424, ext. 29242
  • Ben Franklin Place Client Service Centre – 613-580-2424, ext. 41250
  • Kanata Client Service Centre – 613-580-2424, ext. 33321
  • Metcalfe (Tuesdays) – 613-580-2424, ext. 20009
  • Kinburn (Wednesdays) – 613-580-2424, ext. 32226
  • North Gower (Thursdays) – 613-580-2424, ext. 31303

If you are selling or refinancing a property, you may need a compliance report, which describes the zoning of a property and comments on whether the current use is permitted. It also indicates any outstanding work orders authorized by the Ontario Building Code, and other information on the property.

How to apply for a change in Zoning or Minor Variance

If you want to develop or build on your property in a way that is not permitted in the current zoning, you can apply for a  Zoning Amendment or a Minor Variance.

If you think there’s a problem

If you think a property is being used in a way that is not permitted in the Zoning By-law, you may file a complaint by calling 3-1-1. The City does zoning inspections and enforces the By-law when it receives complaints. It also undertakes Business Licence inspections to ensure businesses licensed by the City conform to the Zoning By-law.

Got Questions?

Telephone the City of Ottawa at 3-1-1.





From a Neighbour: Response to Rezoning Request for Triplexes on Byron

7 11 2018

Please see the attached from a neighbour on a rezoning request for triplexes on Byron. Note that these have been submitted to the City.

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Comments Regarding Planning Committee Decision on Rezoning – 266 and 270 Byron Zoning By-law Amendment Application No. D02-02-17-0037_R Pellarin

 





Westboro Resident Max Finkelstein: Thoughts on Intensification in our Community

7 11 2018

A letter from Westboro resident Max Finkelstein: Thoughts on Intensification in our Community

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Lot after Lot, Thought After thought: The Westboro Story

Or:

Pontification on intensification: the Westboro story

 

This year has seen a bumper crop of little black and white signs all over Westboro.   Back in September, a couple sprouted up on the lot next door informing us of a request for two ‘minor variances’ to allow the construction of two triplexes on the property. Another black and white sign appeared at 514 Roosevelt, just south of Kenwood, also seeking approval for two tripleses and  the same two ‘minor variances. And so began what we have come to call “Westboro and the Creeping Triplex Menace”.  For those of you who actually live in triplexes, please understand that we are not against triplex residents, nor are we against triplexes, but we are against development that contravenes the spirit of the zoning bylaw and that is unplanned, unsupported by the community,  and opportunistic.

For the past few weeks, we have been pouring over the official plan, zoning by-laws, streetscape analyses and other planning tools. Coffee has been spilled many times, as we drift off late in the night trying to understand the complexities of urban planning. But all this research has reinforced what we, and you, already know – that the factors that contribute the most to making a neighbourhood feel like an extension of your home can’t be counted or measured. A house, whether it is a single family home or a triplex, is an expression of values.

When we moved into Westboro two decades ago, we noted its tree-lined streets and unique homes. Attention to detail, pride in workmanship, artistic and innovative design….these homes spoke loudly, and those that are still there, still speak loudly, of these values and more. They looked as if they had grown there, and, like a mature tree, emanate a feeling of stability, of a place where the rate of change is just a little bit slower and saner. It was a neighbourhood that was a mix of small homes, stately homes, apartments, with the Jean d’Arc Convent, with its housing for single women, as one of the anchors of the neighbourhood character.  When we moved into our house at 487 Edison Ave.twenty years ago,  the house was divided into two apartments, and had been that way since about 1944. We lived in the downstairs apartment, and rented out the upstairs one. At one time, in our 1500 sq.ft. home there were seven people, and a few dogs, living there. Our tenants included students, and young families new to Canada (and some squirrels in the attic, and chipmunks under the front porch). It was only when our growing family made us feel cramped in the downstairs apartment that we decided to renovate the house into a single family home.

The first infills on our block, just after the new millennium, were aimed at middle income families. But intensification in the neighbourhood has taken the form of ever-bigger, and ever-more unaffordable, homes. Even the proposed triplexes next door would rent for $2,500 – $3,000/month, which limits them to high income earners. The one new proposal that has received strong community support is the Cornerstone housing development of 42 apartments for single women in the old Jean d’Arc Residence.

All neighbourhoods have a life cycle. Change is inevitable. But change needs to be planned so all the values that come together to make a great neighbourhood are not lost in the rush towards intensification and maximization of tax revenues – both good goals – but at what cost? We know the four tests to evaluate minor variances do not consider any of these values.  But we all know it when we see them, and when we don’t, in building proposals.  When we see identical ‘cookie-cutter’ designs plunked on lots that leave no room for mature trees to survive, when we see concrete and stone from lot line to lot line (‘intensification does not have to be ‘asphatification’) , when we see roof-lines as flat as a left-over morning-after  beer, everybody knows what values are being chosen, and not chosen.

Ottawa’s official plan states up front that  This Plan manages [this] growth in ways that reinforce the qualities of the city most valued by its residents: its distinctly liveable communities, its green and open character, and its unique characteristics that distinguish Ottawa from all other places….The qualities that make neighbourhoods special and contribute to their identity are valued in any consideration of land-use change.

The challenge to planners and politicians, the art and the poetry, is to balance change with community values. We can do both. Let’s work together to make it so. We can do better.

 

“If we add beauty to the world, we can be sure we are doing the right thing.”

 





City of Ottawa: Commemorative Tree Program

7 11 2018

Program

The Commemorative Tree Program was established in 1989. The City assists families or groups who wish to have a tree planted in a City park in remembrance or to commemorate a loved one who has passed away.

Process

  • The family/group chooses a park for the tree. If you do not have a park preference, Forestry Services will assist with the selection of a park.
  • The coordinator of the program will meet with you at the site to choose the location and the type of tree. The selection is made according to preference, site conditions, and availability.
  • The cost of a Commemorative Tree is $400 (plus HST) which includes planting of a 50mm caliper tree and watering for a three year period.
  • The tree will be planted in either the spring or fall.

Plaques

  • Consult with the Forestry Services if you wish to install a plaque next to the tree.
  • The preferred type is a 10 cm thick flat black polished granite marker with an etched inscription. The plaque will be installed flush with the ground to reduce vandalism and allow access of maintenance equipment.
  • Granite plaques may be purchased from a number of monument manufacturers in the Ottawa area. Forestry Services will install the marker at no additional charge.
  • The City is not responsible for the maintenance or replacement of commemorative plaques.

Should you require additional information or would like to purchase a commemorative tree, please contact:3-1-1 for more information.

Parks and streetscape tree planting

Do you know the perfect spot for a tree?

The City of Ottawa is committed to planting trees for the enhancement of our city parks, facilities, and streets. We are taking a proactive approach to the identification of tree planting opportunities on a citywide basis.

The City of Ottawa’s Forestry Services will work with your community group to determine appropriate locations for trees within your community. Project development will include opportunities for input from the public and other city departments, utility clearance checks, appropriate species selection, and an implementation plan for the planting and maintenance of the trees.

Streetscaping

Whether in the urban core area, along suburban streets, or rural roadsides, Forestry Services will work with your community group to enhance city streetscapes through the planting of new trees. Projects may include restoring urban streetscapes, rehabilitation of traffic islands on cul-de-sacs, tree planter rehabilitation, or tree planting in rural villages.

Parks and Facilities tree planting

Forestry Services will partner with your community group to identify new tree planting opportunities within City of Ottawa parks and at city-owned facilities. Projects may include such initiatives as the placement of trees around play structures or benches, the creation of windbreaks, or the planting of trees for shade.

Should you require more information on how your community group may submit tree planting locations to enhance our city streets, parks and facilities, please contact: 3-1-1.

Trees in Trust

The City’s Trees in Trust program needs your help to find suitable locations for street trees. Street trees are available by request on a first come, first served basis. If your City-owned street frontage lacks a tree and you have the time and commitment to help care for one, please contact us.

  • There will be no charge to the homeowner (supply and planting will be provided by the City).
  • The program applies only to homes with street frontage (the space between your property line and the roadway).
  • The property owner must pledge to assist with the proper tree care (watering) for the first three years of the tree’s life. Instructions will be provided.
  • Trees will be a minimum size of 50 mm diameter, or 2 to 3 meters in height.
  • Limit of one tree per single fronting household or two trees per corner lot.
  • The proposed location must meet the Trees in Trust program criteria.

Program criteria:

The following criteria will be used to assess potential planting sites:

  • Is there enough space? (other trees or obstacles must be a minimum of 7m away)
  • Are there overhead or underground utilities?
  • Does the soil quality appear to be acceptable for tree growth?
  • Are there any conflicting uses on the planting site?
  • Has the request been made by the homeowner? (i.e. the person who pays taxes on the property)
  • Is there an obvious conflict with traffic safety requirements or City maintenance (i.e. sightlines or snow removal operations)

Request a tree(link is external)

Requests will be received on an ongoing basis and placed in the next available planting season (spring or fall). Should you require additional information, please contact 3-1-1.

Green Acres – Ottawa’s rural reforestation program

Landowners must be rural property owners within City of Ottawa boundaries, have a minimum of 0.4 hectares (1 acre) of suitable land and must agree to cover the subsidized cost of the tree seedlings, site preparation, planting and tending as well as agreeing to reasonably protect the plantation. The program will provide landowners with:

  • Subsided tree seedlings
  • Advice and assistance in setting up a proper planting plan
  • Assistance caring for the trees after they are planted

The funding is provided to a maximum of 50% on a cost shared basis. Applicants must contact the LandOwner Resource Centre to verify that the proposed project is located in the eligible area and meets the funding guidelines.

Watch this information video on the program and its benefits. http://youtu.be/TR6YOqud5Es(link is external)

For more information contact:
LandOwner Resource Centre
www.Irconline.com(link is external)
info@Irconline.com(link sends e-mail)
613-692-3571
1-800-387-5304

Schoolyard Tree Planting Grant Program

Applications must be received by the City by June 1. Applications that are approved will be planted or funding awarded for spring season the following year. A minimum of one site visit with a City representative is required as part of the grant review process and must be completed between June 1 and December 1 of the application year.

Tornado related tree replacements

The Schoolyard Tree Planting Grant Program is available to schools for replanting of trees lost in the tornadoes and windstorm. Schools within the activation and expansion areas(link is external) can apply until March 1, 2019 for projects to be completed in fall 2019.

Application formPDF opens in a 

 

More information can be found here.





Survey will provide input on the future of retail cannabis stores in Ottawa

6 11 2018

From the City of Ottawa

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Survey will provide input on the future of retail cannabis stores in Ottawa

October 25, 2018
Announcements and Events

Ottawa residents are invited to complete a survey, available on ottawa.ca beginning today, to express their views on whether cannabis retail stores should be allowed in Ottawa.

Residents have from October 25 until November 7 to complete the survey. Paper copies are also available at the City’s Client Service Centres.

The Province of Ontario has created a framework to permit retail cannabis stores to operate in Ontario beginning April 1, 2019. This is in addition to online sales of cannabis through the Ontario Cannabis Store.

Municipalities in Ontario have until January 22, 2019 to decide whether to allow cannabis retail stores to operate within their boundaries.

The results of these online and paper surveys will help inform City Council in its consideration of whether to allow cannabis retail stores to operate in Ottawa.

For more information on the impacts of cannabis legalization in Ottawa, please visit ottawa.ca and OttawaPublicHealth.ca(link is external).

For information on the legal framework for recreational cannabis, please visit the Government of Canada(link is external) and the Province of Ontario(link is external).

More information can be found here: https://ottawa.ca/en/news/survey-will-provide-input-future-retail-cannabis-stores-ottawa

 

 





Reminder: TONIGHT – Byron Place/Churchill/Highcroft Development Update Community Meeting

30 10 2018

Community Meeting Reminder and Update from the Developer

From Councillor Leiper’s Office:

Byron Place / Churchill potential development update – community meeting

You may recall that in February, there was a lot of discussion surrounding a potential development at the corner of Churchill Ave and Byron Place. At the time, a community meeting had been organized to discuss this further, but it came out that the developer was not ready to move forward with their project. However, they are now ready to do so.

We are hosting a community open house to discuss this proposed development on October 30, 2018 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm at the Real Canadian Superstore PC Cooking School. Please encourage your neighbours to attend. At this meeting, the developer will review the details of what they are proposing and what they will be requesting from the City.

It’s important to note that the developer has not formally submitted their application yet, nor has our office been approached to review the proposed development in detail yet. From speaking with Novatech, the urban planning consultant working on behalf of the developer, they want to hear the community feedback at the open house, review the comments and make any changes before submitting formally to the City.

Please don’t hesitate to reach out to Jeff.Leiper@Ottawa.ca and Fiona.Mitchell@Ottawa.ca with any questions, comments or concerns in the meantime. Jeff’s newsletter is unavailable until October 23 (due to the election black-out period), but if you aren’t already signed up to receive it, please consider signing up (by letting me know). When it’s resumed, it will include significant development updates.

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From the Developer:








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