Westboro Community Association Annual General Meeting TONIGHT!

12 11 2019

November 12, 2019

7 – 9 p.m.

Churchill Seniors Centre

345 Richmond Rd, Ottawa
See you there!




WESTBORO AGM: List of speakers confirmed!

7 11 2019

Tuesday, November 12, 6:30 – 9:00PM

Churchill Seniors Center, 345 Richmond Road

This is an important Annual General Meeting for you to attend. We need your input!

  • 6:30 PM doors open – membership sign-in and refreshments – cookies!
  • 7:00 PM reports from Board of Directors
  • Election of new Board
  • Update from Michelle Groulx, Westboro BIA: find out what’s coming up for the holidays!
  • Update from Councillor Leiper
  • Presentation on infill development in the neighbourhood by Robert Sandercott and David Wise, City of Ottawa
  • Time for questions and answers

Come out, meet your neighbours, and discuss the issues important to our community! Become a member for $10 per year – you get to vote. Don’t want to join? Come anyway; all are welcome to share their thoughts on the issues.

Your Community Association needs you! Interested in becoming a board member? Infill development continues to grow and we need people to help with this issue. Or maybe you are interested in the environment, heritage, housing, safety, traffic or working on social events or communications. If so, contact us!

hellowestboro@yahoo.ca





cbc.ca: Westboro curling club turns to redevelopment to sweep away tax troubles

31 10 2019

Deal could see new club built at nearby park, but some neighbours wary

The Granite Curling Club of West Ottawa says it wants to swap land with the city to secure the club’s future with a new mixed-used development.

People who live by the curling club near Westboro station are concerned the plan would amount to a loss of park space, since the club’s replacement four-sheet facility would be built behind the current club on part of Lion’s Park.

Geoff Wilson, club treasurer, told a community meeting Wednesday it’s essential to keep the club operating continuously.

“We cannot redevelop on our existing land without tearing this down first,” he said.

“We can’t knock this thing down and wait two years to have a new structure. It’s gone, it’s game, set and match at that point in time.”

The private, non-profit club is already in a financial tight spot, needing to increase fees after a recent property tax assessment put a strain on their finances.

Their taxes jumped from $8,000 to nearly $25,000 per year.

In the club membership’s preferred option, the curling facility would be built behind the existing building and stretch into Lion’s Park.

The developer would build a high-rise commercial and residential tower that could be 25 storeys tall.

The club said it would give the city a stretch of land to the east, larger than it would be taking, for a linear park.

A drawing of the Granite Curling Club of West Ottawa’s preferred redevelopment option, which would have the club occupy part of the current Lion’s Park. (KitchissippiWard.ca)

Loretta Fleming, who lives in a nearby co-op, is worried about the encroachment on parkland.

“This is our community too. We’re residents. When they’re gone after their hour or two of curling, it’s our park,” she said.

She’s concerned about ecological and community loss of having the city turn over existing green space at the request of any private group, even a non-profit.

“It would be a precedent that parkland is up for grabs,” she said.

“I don’t think it’s a good use of space for the people who are using the park right now, which are young children,” said Talitha Nabbali.

Linear park less versatile

Greg Mathieu, chair of the Granite Club’s redevelopment committee, said the proposal would make the park space more accessible to the community since it’s blocked from Scott Street by the current curling club building.

“Our feeling is about Lion’s Park is that it’s a great community asset. We believe we’re a community asset as well as the gymnastics club,” he said.

“We think opening it up to Scott Street … is going to provide some greater community use overall.”

Paul Landry, a senior project manager in the city’s parks department, said the linear park configuration would make the land less adaptable to different recreational uses.

“Even though you can get nice pathways, sitting areas, perhaps a splash pad and things like that — it still limits the utility of the park,” Landry said.

Coun. Jeff Leiper told residents at the meeting that is also his concern, but that he hasn’t taken a position on the proposal or the unusual request to swap land with the city.

The club has not filed a development or zoning application with the city.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/granite-curling-club-redevelopment-park-1.5341520





cbc.ca: Residents eye more balance, certainty with Westboro development reboot

25 10 2019

Infill study could shape future of development along LRT

Triplexes, like this one built on Ravenhill Avenue, were already popular in Westboro, but some developers were proposing building two triplexes on a single lot before a moratorium last year. (Eric Milligan)
Today is the deadline for Westboro residents to have their say on the future of intensification in the rapidly growing neighbourhood west of Ottawa’s downtown.

City council voted in October 2018 for a moratorium on the approval of multi-unit buildings from Golden Avenue east to Tweedsmuir Avenue, and Byron Avenue south to Dovercourt Avenue.

That moratorium was extended until 2020.

Eric Milligan, who has lived in a Westboro infill home himself for the past eight years, is encouraging his neighbours to send feedback to the city about the type of development they want in their neighbourhood.

“We’d like to get it back into balance. We think it’s horribly out of balance right now,” Milligan said.

He said people understand intensification is one of the city’s objectives for the core, but that people want to protect aspects of their quality of life — especially as developers would apply to build triplexes and then seek variances to fit even more units on a lot.

“It’s having a massive impact on the character of the neighbourhood, the amount of green space that’s available on the lots, the destruction of mature trees, parking, congestion,” he said.

Milligan said he thinks provincial rule changes will also be required to rebuild trust among his neighbours for a system they see benefiting developers.

Infill will spread along LRT, councillor says

Kitchissippi Coun. Jeff Leiper, who put forward the motion, said so far feedback has ranged from calling for greater height allowances close to the expanding LRT line, to trying to avoid change.

Leiper said he’s glad the study asks people what they love about their neighbourhood so the city can format better zoning rules.

“The challenge is going to try to turn ‘What I love about my neighbourhood’ into new math. So we can describe it objectively and quantitatively,” he said.

The councillor said the results of the Westboro study can be a model for other neighbourhoods as LRT spreads the pressure for intensification. 

“Developers are going to start eyeing neighbourhoods, like what’s around Blair Station, for the next wave of infill, so this study is probably going to give the city some new tools be able to address what the rules should be around infill,” Leiper said.

Leiper said no single study or rule change will rebuild trust for community members, but having the city define and enforce rules based on what residents want should reduce the number of fights between the neighbours and developers.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/westboro-infill-study-deadline-1.5334732

 





REMINDER: Westboro Infill Study Comments Due October 25

24 10 2019

From the City of Ottawa:

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The City has completed a Discussion Paper summarizing the issues relating to infill development within Westboro. Some of the issues covered include but are not necessarily limited to:

  • Existing housing and development trends within the neighbourhood;
  • The type, size, and location of infill development in Westboro;
  • Defining the neighbourhood’s character;
  • The development of three-unit and multi-unit buildings;
  • The use and function of front and rear yards.

The issues covered within the paper are not meant to be an exhaustive list. We would love to hear your input on the issues you’ve encountered with infill within the neighbourhood, as well as what you love about Westboro and want to see enhanced as the community grows.

The paper is available at the project website at this link. We would appreciate hearing any questions or comments you may have by October 25, 2019.





FCA Workshop: A New Official Plan for Ottawa

24 10 2019

Please see the poster below from the Federation of Citizens’ Associations of Ottawa:

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1946 Scott St.: Zoning By-law Amendment Application

24 10 2019

From the City of Ottawa:

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Please be advised that a Zoning By-law Amendment application has been submitted for 1946 Scott Street (File No. D02-02-19-0117). The applicant proposes the construction of a 9-storey, 48-unit residential apartment building with 14 below-grade automobile parking spaces and 52 bicycle parking spaces. The underground parking is located in the basement of the building and will be accessed from the rear of the building.

Below is a preview of the submitted site plan and perspective rendering, which will be sent in full during circulation.

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