Notice of Public Meeting: 403 Tweedsmuir Avenue

14 02 2018

From the City of Ottawa’s Planning Department:

The applicant and the Councillor’s office have scheduled an Open House meeting on Thursday February 22, 2018, to discuss the proposed rezoning application to allow for the future redevelopment of 403 Tweedsmuir Avenue into a six storey mixed-use apartment and hotel.

All members of the public are invited to attend.

When: Thursday February 22, 2018 from 6:30pm-8:30pm

Where: 190 Richmond Road, Real Canadian Superstore Test Kitchen (upstairs)

The applicant’s team will be providing display boards with various images of the proposal and members of the applicant team will be circulating the room to answer any questions about the proposal.

The notice prepared by the applicant is attached.

403 Tweedsmuir – notice of public meeting

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Ash tree removal along the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway by Island Park Drive

17 01 2018

See below from the NCC:

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Hello,

As part of its emerald ash borer management strategy, the National Capital Commission (NCC) will be removing ash trees affected by the emerald ash borer along the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway close to Island Park Drive.

The work will take place from January 15 to 19, 2018, and will be undertaken between 7 am and 5 pm, weather permitting. The work will not require any closures, as the contractor will have personnel on-site directing people around the work zone, as required. Users should respect the signage installed at pathway entry points.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the NCC’s client services at 613-239-5000 or info@ncc-ccn.ca. For more details on the emerald ash borer management program, please visit our website.

We thank you for your understanding, and invite you to share this message with the members of your community.

 

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Bonjour,

Dans le cadre de sa stratégie de gestion de l’agrile du frêne, la Commission de la capitale nationale (CCN) coupera des frênes atteints par cette maladie le long de la promenade Sir-John-A.-Macdonald à proximité de la promenade Island Park.

Les travaux se dérouleront du 15 au 18 janvier 2018, entre 7 h et 17 h, si la météo le permet. Ils ne nécessiteront aucune fermeture, puisque l’entrepreneur aura du personnel sur place pour diriger les gens près de la zone des travaux, au besoin. Les usagers sont priés de respecter les panneaux de signalisation qui seront installés aux différents départs de sentiers.

Si vous avez des questions, n’hésitez pas à communiquer avec le service à la clientèle de la CCN au 613-239-5000 ou à info@ncc-ccn.ca. Pour plus de renseignements concernant le programme de gestion de l’agrile du frêne, veuillez consulter notre site Web.

Nous vous remercions de votre compréhension et vous invitons à transmettre ce message aux résidants de votre quartier.





Site Plan Control Application – 386 Richmond Road

19 11 2017

Fro the City of Ottawa:

Please be advised that the Planning Services has received an application for a Site Plan Control application for 386 Richmond Road.

The subject site is located in Westboro, between Churchill Avenue North to the east and Roosevelt Avenue to the west. The site is approximately 343 square metres with 10 metres of frontage along Richmond Road. It is currently occupied by a one storey vacant commercial space fronting Richmond Road that transitions into a one and a half storey duplex residence at the rear of the building. There is currently a driveway on the eastern side of the site, providing access to parking at the rear. To the north, the site abuts Richmond Road, beyond which is a number of two-storey commercial, office, and restaurant uses that front onto Richmond Road. To the east, south, and west, the site abuts one- and two-storey commercial and office buildings.

The purpose of this Site Plan Control application is to develop a six-storey mixed-use building. The proposed uses include at-grade commercial, second floor office use, and a total of 16 dwelling units. No vehicular parking spaces are proposed.





CBC.ca: Library board advised to refurbish Rosemount library to save money

12 10 2017

Library board advised to refurbish Rosemount library to save money

Building a newer, bigger branch carries too much risk, report says
CBC News Posted: Oct 09, 2017 7:30 AM ET Last Updated: Oct 10, 2017 8:29 PM ET

UPDATED

  • The library board voted on Oct. 10 to accept the recommendation to renovate the existing building.
  • Library board chair says new design will include open spaces and meeting rooms.
  • A group asking for a new library said report didn’t consider the growth of the neighbourhood.
  • The City of Ottawa should renovate — not relocate — a popular library in Hintonburg because it’s the most affordable option facing the aging building, says a new report.

On Tuesday, the Ottawa Public Library (OPL) board will receive a report recommending the least favourite idea put forward by bookworms to revitalize the Rosemount Library.

Richard Van Loon of the Rosemount Expansion and Development Group wanted the city to build a newer, modern library to replace the Rosemount branch, which turns 100 next year.

The citizen’s group was in favour of a 10,000-to-15,000-square foot facility, significantly larger than the current 6,089-square-foot building.

A firm tapped to conduct a business case to inform the board on how to proceed explored six options: rehabilitating the existing building, leasing commercial space, relocating and expanding the building, and three scenarios involving relocating the branch to vacant parklands.

After weighing all the options, staff concluded that Hintonburg ranked low in terms of projected service growth compared to other neighbourhoods.

“All six options require a significant financial investment to implement. OPL has an annual pay-as-you-go capital funding envelope of $2.6 million,” the report stated.

“With 33 branches, system-wide service pressures, and competing priorities, the preferred option is the one that is the most affordable: to renovate the existing facility.”

$2-million cost for preferred option

The preferred option comes with an estimated price tag of $2 million, according to Boxfish Consultants, the firm that made the business case.

At $2.9 million, the option favoured by the citizens’ group also turned out to be the most expensive. The analysis by the consultants ruled the first option was the only “affordable” one among the six.

“This option represents the best alignment with OPL’s strategic objectives, and is expected to be cost effective and relatively lower risk when compared to most of the other options considered,” the report stated.

If approved, construction work on the Rosemount branch would wrap up in early 2020 after an architect is chosen and public consultations are held, according to the report.

The library board also has another renewal project on its hands — a new central branch in downtown Ottawa. That project is awaiting word as to whether the federal government will be a partner on the super-library project.

The Ottawa Public Library board meets Tuesday at 5 p.m. at city hall.

The business case can be accessed here.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/library-board-urged-refurbish-rosemount-library-1.4346252





1946 Scott Street: Site Plan Control Proposal and Minor Zoning By-law Amendment

1 10 2017

From the City of Ottawa:

This is the formal circulation of the planning application noted above. Below is a link to the application on the City’s Development Application Search Tool where you will find information about the application and all of the submitted plans, reports, surveys and accompanying documents you will need to review the application. Also attached is the application summary.

Link to the Site Plan Control Application on DevApps is here.

Link to the Zoning By-law Amendment Application on DevApps is here.

Please comment directly to the File Lead through the “Send comments to the file lead” link of DevApps.

Note that the deadline date for comments is October 25, 2017.





Survey on responsible trail management in Gatineau Park

29 04 2017

Hello,
We are seeking your input on the initiative for responsible trail management in Gatineau Park. In order to complete the survey, we suggest consulting the NCC’s website, where you will find further information about the initiative. The survey will be available online until May 15, 2017.
Your comments will be analyzed, and will be taken into consideration, where possible, in finalizing the results of the responsible trail management initiative for Gatineau Park.
Your opinion is greatly valued, and we hope to continue working with you in the near future, as this initiative is implemented. The public consultation of April 27, 2017, is available for viewing on YouTube.

Complete the survey here.

Sincerely,
Christie Spence
Director, Quebec Urban Lands and Gatineau Park
Sondage sur la gestion responsable des sentiers du parc de la Gatineau

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Bonjour,
Nous souhaitons connaître votre opinion sur le projet de gestion responsable des sentiers du parc de la Gatineau. Avant de répondre au sondage, nous vous suggérons de consulter le site Web de la CCN où vous trouverez de l’information sur ce projet. Le sondage sera accessible en ligne jusqu’au 15 mai 2017.
Nous analyserons vos commentaires et nous en tiendrons compte pour bonifier le projet de gestion responsable des sentiers du parc de la Gatineau, lorsque cela sera possible.
Votre opinion nous importe et nous espérons continuer de collaborer avec vous pour la mise en œuvre de ce projet. Vous pouvez voir la séance de consultation publique du 27 avril 2017 sur YouTube.

Compléter le sondage ici.
Sincères salutations.
La directrice, Terrains urbains du Québec et parc de la Gatineau,
Christie Spence





Proposed Policy for Posting 30 km/hr speed: Letter From Friends of Broadview Ave Committee

26 04 2017

Below is a letter from the Friends of Broadview Ave Committee on the city’s proposed policy for posting 30 km/hr speed limits.

Our apologies for the delay in posting this.

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April 4, 2017

Dear Mayor Watson, Councillor Egli, and other members of the Transportation Committee,

It just came to our attention last night that the Transportation Committee will be discussing for approval the draft “Policy for Posting 30 km/hr speed limits” this Wednesday. As we will not be able to attend the meeting with such short notice, we are writing to share with you our concerns with the policy as drafted.

To be clear, we strongly support the introduction of a policy to allow for 30 km/hr speed zones in order to promote a safe and liveable city. We have been advocating for 30 km/hr speed limits in school zones and other areas where vulnerable populations are at risk for several years. This would be consistent with other cities, including across the river in Gatineau.

However, we cannot support this policy for two reasons: 1) the focus on existing road conditions may lead to the exclusion of streets where there are vulnerable populations and a real need for lower speed limits; and 2) the “petition” approach is ineffective since it leads to inconsistencies in application across the city and overall poor neighbourhood planning.

With regard to the first point, we would kindly request answers to the following questions and would suggest that the Committee reflect on these answers before making any decision on the Policy. Specifically:
– How many roads near schools (listed in Document 1 of the background material) will qualify under this proposed policy?
– How many roads with temporary traffic calming measures, identified as priority areas by their respective Councillors, will qualify? (i.e. the traffic calming flags, some of which even say 30 km/hr)

In our neighbourhood, due to the width requirements, it is unclear if Broadview Ave will be eligible even though there are three schools with a total of over 2,500 students on only three blocks. Further, Dovercourt Ave, where hundreds of students walk between the elementary school and Dovercourt Recreation Center, will not qualify since there is transit service (would it really hurt for the bus to slow down for a few blocks?). Both these streets are minor collectors and were not designed for massive through traffic, yet they are absorbing increased traffic, travelling at higher speeds, resulting from intensification in the area.

Our second concern relates to the fact that many of the downtown wards have streets designed in a grid pattern. Given the current default speed limit of 50 km/hr, this policy would now enable two parallel streets with similar characteristics to have a 20 km/hr difference in their speed limits strictly because residents on one street are more vocal and have the time/inclination to collect the necessary signatures. It took the Hintonburg Community Association approximately 1700 hours to get the petitions necessary to ensure a community wide reduction in the speed limit. It is not realistic to expect all neighbourhoods to do this. In fact, by focusing on petitions, this policy provides less protection to communities composed of lower income or new immigrant families as they are less likely to have the means or understand the processes to mobilize and request the change. That is unacceptable.

Further, the “petition approach” can lead to poor neighbour planning and unintentional negative outcomes. As an example, based on the petition approach for 40 km/hr streets, Dovercourt Ave. was converted to 40 km/hr from Sherbourne Ave to Denbury Ave but remained 50 km/hr from Denbury Ave to Churchill Ave since Denbury Ave is the dividing line of the two community associations. Not only was this nonsensical, it was also dangerous since the speed limit increased right in front of an elementary school! Our committee lobbied our previous Councillor for over a year and worked with our current Councillor for 6 months to get this fixed. Can you imagine the number of cases that may arise with potential 20 km/hr difference in speed limits? As individual streets are converted to 30 km/hr, traffic patterns will change and is very likely there will be undesirable consequences. Further, budgets for temporary traffic calming measures, which are already insufficient, will be stretched even further – and possibly directed away from more pressing community needs – to meet the policy’s requirement of reducing the entrance throat of roadways to 7meters. Why have Area Traffic Management Plans if this new policy is going to further encourage a one-off approach?

On a final note, while we understand that the city is waiting for provincial decisions that would allow lower speed limits by default since the costs of putting up signage on every street is prohibitive, our overall question is: does it make sense for the city to prioritize streets to appease “squeaky wheels” or should the city prioritize lower speed limits based on overall community need? We strongly believe it should be the latter. As such, we are writing to ask the Committee not to approve this policy, but instead to develop a new draft based on sound public policy objectives – specifically, the purpose should be to make Ottawa a livable and safe city by ensuring our streets are safe for all users and vulnerable populations in particular. 30 km/hr speed zones should be implemented first and foremost in school zones and other community areas with vulnerable populations and should be introduced in a consistent manner across the city.

Sincerely,

Andy Czajkowski, Gary Larkin and Laura Griggs (co-chairs of the Friends of Broadview Ave Committee)








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